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Meet the JTH Associate Editor: Wolfgang Bergmeier

Friday, April 14, 2017   (0 Comments)
Posted by: Luke Blount
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The Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis has added three new Associate Editors to their editorial staff, Andreas Greinacher and Wolfgang Bergmeier of Germany as well as Pierre Toulon of France. The ISTH recently conducted a Q&A with Wolfgang Bergmeier, Ph.D., a 2013 recipient of an ISTH Biennial Award for Contributions to Hemostasis (BACH) Investigator Recognition Award.

 

Wolfgang
Bergmeier

ISTH: Where are you from?

Wolfgang Bergmeier: Landshut, Germany. Landshut is the capital of Lower Bavaria.


Where do you work? What is your job title and expertise?

WB: I am an Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My work focuses on the signaling events controlling platelet adhesion at sites of vascular injury.


What do you see as your biggest triumph in your work?

WB: Work we did in transgenic mice aided in (1) the discovery of patients with mutations in CalDAG-GEFI (RasGRP2), a critical regulator of integrin signaling in platelets, and (2) new mechanistic insight into how clinically used inhibitors of the ADP receptor, P2Y12, affect platelet signaling and thus function. To me there is no bigger triumph than seeing how our work impacts the clinical situation.


Who is/was the most influential person in your life and why?

WB: I had great mentors in science throughout my career, but there is no doubt that my parents were the most influential people in my life. They are not academics but they always supported what I did. But their most important influence on me is the values they taught me while I was growing up, values that have guided every decision I have made in my professional career.


What advice would you give to someone just beginning their career?

WB: This is a very loaded question, especially given that my advice to a beginning student/fellow would differ from that given to a Junior faculty. Independent of the stage in the career I would make the following suggestion:

Don’t be satisfied with your work, but don’t try to rush your career. To be successful in science you cannot be complacent with the progress of your work. Every experiment, successful or not, should make you want to go back to the drawing board and the bench. You need to want to know basically every angle of your project and you should have the desire to think ahead in more than one direction. It is a good sign if you wake up once in a while in the middle of the night because you cannot get your work out of your head. The more senior you become in your career the more complex your job will be. Paper and grant writing skills will become really critical. Talks and connections in the field will be almost as important as your work. Use your time as a trainee wisely and get yourself prepared for the day when you make the leap to independence. It is not a question of “how many papers do I need before I can transition to independence” but instead you should ask yourself the following question: “am I comfortable doing ALL these things myself”?


When did you become an Associate Editor of the JTH and why?

WB: I am very new to the JTH Editorial board. I did not hesitate at all to join as an Associate Editor – it’s an honor to be working for this excellent journal!


What do you like to do with your free time?

WB: Family, sports and wood working.


In a different life, what would your profession be?

WB: Horse farmer, even though I don’t know how to ride a horse - yet.


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